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Healthy Home Gardening
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Healthy Home Gardening



1

3701
Cecille33
Cecille33
red and pink flower
  red and pink flower August 23, 2014
red and pink flower
2

4057
gardengeek
gardengeek
Eucalyptus
  Eucalyptus April 15, 2014
used to drain swamps and thereby reduce the risk of malaria Eucalyptus
3

2811
gardengeek
gardengeek
Black Mulberry
  Black Mulberry March 07, 2014
Leaves are fed to Silk Worms (white mulberry) Black Mulberry
4

1784
gardengeek
gardengeek
Sweet Chestnut
  Sweet Chestnut March 02, 2014
Cooking dry in an oven or fire normally helps remove this skin. Chestnuts are traditionally roasted in their tough brown husks after removing the spiny cupules in which they grow on the tree Sweet Chestnut
5

2650
xfersx
xfersx
Opo Squash
  Opo Squash August 13, 2013
The calabash was one of the first cultivated plants in the world, grown not primarily for food, but for use as a water container. The bottle gourd may have been carried from Africa to Asia, Europe and the Americas in the course of human migration.[1] It shares its common name with that of the calabash tree (Crescentia cujete). Opo Squash
6

2627
xfersx
xfersx
Mimosa Pudica
  Mimosa Pudica August 01, 2013
http://www.ijpsdr.com/pdf/vol5-issue2/1.pdf Mimosa Pudica
7

3516
lowemal
lowemal
blue elderberry
  blue elderberry December 06, 2012
blue elderberry can grow as tall as 20 feet but usually only growing to 9. this plant has jagged leaves and this plant was widely used by southern California native americans in a multitude of ways they made flutes, bows, pipes, out of the easy to work with and hollow wood. the berries can make pies, jellies, jams, wines but are toxic if not cooked properly. [[]]http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SANIC5[[]] blue elderberry
8

4972
Producer
Producer
Devil's Horn
  Devil's Horn September 05, 2012
[[]]http://www.naturesongs.com/vvplants/devilshorn.html[[]] [[]]http://waynesword.palomar.edu/ww0801.htm[[]] Devil's Horn
9

3176
freegarden
freegarden
Tabebuia chrysotricha
  Tabebuia chrysotricha April 19, 2012
Tabebuia chrysotricha
10

7292
gardengeek
gardengeek
Hemp Dogbane
  Hemp Dogbane June 26, 2011
a hyperaccumulator used to sequester lead in its biomass. used as a source of fiber by Native Americans, to make hunting nets, fishing lines, clothing, and twine. Apocynum cannabinum Hemp Dogbane
11

3548
georgepuli1
georgepuli1
Peace Lily
  Peace Lily June 12, 2011
Potted plant. Had it for 7-8 years Peace Lily
12

4026
JasmineCubana
JasmineCubana
Frangipani
  Frangipani May 14, 2011
Frangipani
13

5351
AlyDawn
AlyDawn
Japanese Privet
  Japanese Privet February 07, 2011
[[]]http://www.duke.edu/~cwcook/trees/lija.html[[]] Japanese Privet
14

3845
Biocentric333
Biocentric333
Pink Azalea
  Pink Azalea September 20, 2010
According to Wikipedia "Azalea plants are very toxic to equines, sheep and goats, but cause no problems in cats or dogs." Their blossoms are also used in a traditional Korean grape wine called Tugyonju. [[]]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azalea[[]] [[]]http://www.azaleas.org/azxintro.html[[]] Pink Azalea
15

5983
Desert_Sage
Desert_Sage
Yucca Fruit
  Yucca Fruit August 22, 2010
Yucca Fruit
16

6133
gardengeek
gardengeek
Pinyon Pine
  Pinyon Pine July 19, 2010
The pinyon pine nut (seed) species will take 18 months to complete its maturity, however, in order to reach full maturity the environmental conditions must be favorable for the tree and its fruit. Development begins in early spring with pollinization. A tiny cone (small marble size) will form from mid spring to the end of summer in which the premature cone will then become and remain dormant (cessation of growth) until the following spring. The cone will then commence growth until it reaches mat Pinyon Pine
17

5064
gardengeek
gardengeek
Bristlecone Pine
  Bristlecone Pine July 19, 2010
Bristlecone Pine
18

1989
gardengeek
gardengeek
Aspen Tree
  Aspen Tree July 19, 2010
Aspen Tree
19

2997
gardengeek
gardengeek
Papery Birch
  Papery Birch June 30, 2010
Papery Birch
20

7875
gardengeek
gardengeek
Coral Root Orchid
  Coral Root Orchid June 30, 2010
Most species are leafless, relying entirely upon symbiotic fungi within their coral-shaped roots for sustenance. Because of this dependence on myco-heterotrophy within their mycorrhizae, they cannot be successfully cultivated. Most species do not produce chlorophyll, and do not depend on photosynthesis for energy. An exception is the yellowish green species Corallorhiza trifida, which has some chlorophyll and is only partially dependent on its fungal associates for nutrition. Coral Root Orchid
21

3783
gardengeek
gardengeek
Carpetweed
  Carpetweed June 30, 2010
Carpetweed
22

2669
gardengeek
gardengeek
Oak Tree
  Oak Tree June 25, 2010
Oak Tree
23

15014
gardengeek
gardengeek
Birch Tree
  Birch Tree June 25, 2010
Birch Tree
24

13239
Thunder
Thunder
Daisy Fleabane
  Daisy Fleabane June 18, 2010
Ancient Europeans believed that the odor of this genus repelled fleas, thus the name fleabane. This seems to have no basis in fact. The Ojibwas used the smoke of disk florets to attract deer and in their smoking mixture or kinnikinnick . Fleabane's common name reflects its use as a bug repellant. In fact, starlings line their nests with fleabane to keep mites away. People once mixed it with bedstraw to keep bugs out of their mattresses. It's toxic to mollusks and helps prevent fungus infection Daisy Fleabane
25

5696
Thunder
Thunder
Japanese Camellia
  Japanese Camellia June 18, 2010
In Japan, where the Camellia or Tsubaki has such a long-gardened history, the language of flowers is older than in the west. Camellias are sometimes said to represent business success, virtue, happiness, fidelity, luxury, tastefulness, & a life concluding in the ease of retirement. But that is in great part a modern imposition or overlay, because formerly the camellia, akin to cherry blossoms which symbolized evanescense, was symbolic of a short life lived in a blaze of glory, or in faithful Japanese Camellia
26

8162
gardengeek
gardengeek
Red Osier Dogwood
  Red Osier Dogwood June 16, 2010
The fruit of several species in the subgenera Cornus and Benthamidia is edible, though without much flavour. The berries of those in subgenus Swida are mildly toxic to people, though readily eaten by birds. They were used by pioneers to brush their teeth. The pioneers would peel off the bark, bite the twig and then scrub their teeth. [[]]http://healthyhomegardening.com/Plant.php?pid=577[[]] Red Osier Dogwood
27

11038
Thunder
Thunder
Japanese Flowering Cherry
  Japanese Flowering Cherry June 15, 2010
This tree, along with other cousins of the same species, is the very symbol of spring beauty. One of the most widely planted ornamental cherry trees, it is ideal for planting close to sidewalks or as a patio shade tree A green dye can be obtained from the leaves. A dark grey to green dye can be obtained from the fruit Cherry wood is used for making fine furniture, cabinets, musical instruments, and carvings. The heartwood of cherry ranges from rich red to reddish brown and darkens with age an Japanese Flowering Cherry
28

27931
Entheogen
Entheogen
Opium Poppy
  Opium Poppy June 14, 2010
Opium is the source of many opiates, including morphine, thebaine, codeine, papaverine, and noscapine. The Latin botanical name means, loosely, the "sleep-bringing poppy", referring to the sedative properties of some of these opiates. The plant itself is also valuable for ornamental purposes, and has been known as the "common garden poppy", referencing all the group of poppy plants. Poppy seeds of Papaver somniferum are an important food item and the source of poppyseed oil Opium Poppy
29

9029
Thunder
Thunder
Sweet Grass
  Sweet Grass June 14, 2010
Sweet grass was, and is, very widely used by North American indigenous peoples. As a sacred plant, it is used in peace and healing rituals. Leaves are dried and made into braids and burned as vanilla-scented incense; long leaves of sterile shoots are used by Native Americans in making baskets. Medicinal Uses: A tea is brewed by Native Americans for coughs, sore throats, chafing and venereal infections. It is also used by women to stop vaginal bleeding and to expel afterbirth. It is warned that Sweet Grass
30

3639
Thunder
Thunder
White Cedar
  White Cedar June 14, 2010
The plant was first identified as a remedy by native Indians in Canada during a 16th century expedition and was found to prove effective in the treatment of weakness from scurvy. ). In folk medicine, Thuja occ has been used to treat bronchial catarrh, enuresis, cystitis, psoriasis, uterine carcinomas, amenorrhea and rheumatism. Medicinal Uses: According to Hartwell (19671971), the plant, usually as a tincture, is used in folk remedies for benign skin tumors, cancers, condylomata (of penis and White Cedar
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